By: Blonde Two

It gets windy out there on those hills (we have an excellent ‘how to pitch your tent in the wind‘ video here). So windy in fact that sometimes we Blondes emerge in the morning amazed that our tent hasn’t blown away with us in it during the night.

Although we have seen whole marquees blown, like super-tumbleweed across Okehampton Camp at the start of Ten Tors weekend, most modern backpacking tents are designed to bend in the right places and shaped to allow the wind to pass over them. There are, of course, some basic principles when it comes to pitching a tent in windy weather that will give you a greater chance of ending the night where you started it. These include pitching so that the door faces away from the wind, pitching so that the wind isn’t hitting your tent broadside on and ‘storm lashing’ or crossing guy ropes to give more stability. The latter was a trick I learned back in my days of Guide camping and is often more suited to a ridge style tent but, if you give the matter some consideration, you will find that some of the guys on your backpacking tent may benefit from being crossed over each other as this tends to give a firmer hold.

One really simple method of strengthening your tent is to double peg. This is particularly relevant where the ground is either too stony to get pegs right into or too soft to hold them safely. It would be unpractical to carry enough pegs to double peg all of your guy ropes but we recommend carrying a few spare so that you can focus on the important ones. These tend to be the guy ropes that are on the windward side of the tent and on poles rather than the fabric.

By the way… the picture at the top of this post is for demonstration purposes. Tent pegs should ideally be angled at 45 degrees away from the tent and inserted all the way into the ground.